Extra, Extra….Read All About It

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We always have that eternal debate in photography of Digital vs Analogue. I firmly subscribe to the latter, that film still has a core niche market. There are still photographers out there who continue to use it, and use it religiously. Digital may have today’s market and ever-growing – but, as Tom Stanworth once remarked, “Digital photography is like shaved legs on a man – very smooth and clean but there is something acutely disconcerting about it”

 

There’s also another digital vs analogue argument going on in the mainstream publishing and printing industry. Personally speaking – and not to mention a vested interest of the day job requiring me to fill white-space for The Scotsman newspaper back home in Scotland – I would rather sit down with either a newspaper, magazine or book to read than reach for my increasingly more omnipresent iPad. But I was on hand recently at one of my all-time favourite Seattle haunts, the “Read All About It” newsstand at Pike’s Place Market, as one of the co-owners declared it was almost a nostalgic step-back in time for him, with the biggest daily sale of a newspaper there since the death of President Kennedy: The Seattle Times’ commemorative issue of the Seattle Seahawks winning the Super Bowl.

 

Leica M3 & 50mm Summilux V2

B+W Yellow Filter

Sekonic L-308S

Ilford FP4+(@200)

HC-110 (Dil.H – 1:63 @ 13 minutes)

Plustek 7600i & Vuescan

 

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David Simon, the creative genius behind acclaimed television hits Homicide: Life on the Street, The Wire and Treme, is not one to mince his words. Late last year, the former Baltimore Sun crime reporter and award-winning screenwriter spoke out on the divide between rich and poor in America. His epic address during the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney, Australia, went viral with many news outlets in America picking up on the story. 

 

Simon began his speech by saying: “I come from a country that is now utterly schizophrenic when it comes to its society, its economy, its politics. There are definitely two Americas. I live in one, on one block in Baltimore that is part of the viable America, the America that is connected to its own economy, where there is a plausible future for the people born into it.  About 20 blocks away is another America entirely. It’s astonishing how little we have to do with each other, and yet we are living in such proximity.”

 

And I don’t have to venture as far as 20 blocks in supposedly affluent Seattle to identify with what Simon is saying: Not only two Americas, but also two Seattles. Today’s photo shows someone (who doesn’t wish to be photographed from the front) who lives in that other Seattle, that other America. She’s a regular of the 4th Avenue corridor, wearing her distinctive green anorak, emblazoned with “Dartmouth Swimming”, who patiently sits all day at her usual spot across from Ralph’s Groceries, with her worldly goods in a rolling carry-on bag beside her, waiting for the nearby YWCA hostel to open its doors at 6pm so she can register for a bed for the night.

 

Leica M3 & 50mm Summilux V2
B+W Yellow Filter
Sekonic L-308S
Ilford FP4+(@200)
HC-110 (Dil.H – 1:63 @ 13 minutes)
Plustek 7600i & Vuescan

 

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