Knox & Crosses
Knox & Crosses
By: jbhthescots@mac.com, Categories: Words & Images, 7 comments

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In May 1559, John Knox – after being in exile in Geneva – arrived back in Scotland and, in Perth, began a fiery sermon against Catholic idolatry that proved so effective that when the service was over, the congregation immediately began to demolish altars, smash images, statues, and crucifixes.

 

There then began the systematic removal across the country of all the superstitious trappings of the Roman Catholic Church, as Knox’s Reformation preaching reverberated throughout Scotland. Crucifixes as such were seen as a particularly strong Catholic emblem and, much like a vampire, shunned by the now staunchly Protestant Scots during this turbulent religious period in history.

 

The straightforward crucifix variety was banned as monuments until the late 19th century and very rarely does it appear as a symbolic carving; and indeed, inspection of the dates inscribed on them at The Glasgow Necropolis shows few are more than 100 years old. But by the 1890s Celtic crosses – with Celtic knotwork and other antique decoration – began to appear in cemeteries and churches.

 

And in our fittingly final noir-ish graveyard shot in the Necropolis series, this particular Celtic cross monument belongs to Alexander McCall, Chief Constable of the Glasgow Police, 1870-1888. It was designed by none other than the renowned Glasgow architect, Charles Rennie Mackintosh (whose policeman father, William, had worked as McCall’s assistant); and its believed to have been the young designer’s first commission.

 

Leica M6 & 90mm Elmarit
Kodak Tri-X (200)
HC-110 (Dil.B – 1:31 – 7 min)
Plustek 7600i & Vuescan

 

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7 Comments

  • A Smashing Good ending !

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  • John: Jim from Tacoma here. Really like your images--you are making great use of the 90 Elmarit you bought from me!

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    • Hi Jim: Yes, definitely a very under-rated lens in the Leica lineup! A good and alternative cheaper option to the 90mm Summicron.

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  • Final entry? You were just getting going!!
    I enjoyed the journey though.

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    • Such a lot of history and imagery in The Necropolis that I could go on longer. Will cut it here - though will return later with more from another Glasgow graveyard with a history to it, namely The Southern Necropolis!

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  • John: this Phil in Seattle. Follows you advice and boughtan M3/50mm lens from Mark @ Glazer. Thanks again!

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    • A wonderful combination, Phil! You will have more fun with that combo than any digital. And also a wonderful combination is Mark & Glazer's!

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